5 Easy Fermented Foods You can Make in Your Kitchen

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5 Easy Fermented Foods You can Make in Your Kitchen

Submitted by AdminSite on Sat, 10/10/2015 - 20:21


At Love and Compassion we adore fermented foods! They are real food and they contain good bacteria for healthy digestion. Probiotic pills are not real foods as they often do not survive through digestion, therefore they do not get to the intestines.  The fermented foods help you develop healthy gut flora (that’s the trillions of beneficial bacteria that live in your intestinal tract). Some of these bacteria are beneficial for heath, but some are harmful to health. They contribute to inflammation and disease in your body when they begin to outnumber the beneficial bacteria. Keeping a healthy balance of intestinal flora also helps boost your immune system. Overgrowth of bad bacteria in the gut is now understood to be linked to allergies, anxiety, mental fog and other psychological conditions. Maintaining healthy gut flora is absolutely crucial for overall health and wellness.

I am Japanese and I grew up with numerous healthy fermented foods, including miso, soy sauce, natto (fermented soy beans), and a variety of fermented vegetables. In Japan, fermented foods always come with a main dish. Fermented foods come from the wisdom of our ancestors to improve the nutrients of the food as well as for the purpose of preservation.

Here are five of our favorite, easy recipes for making fermented foods at home:
 

1. Sauerkraut 


Sauerkraut is pickled cabbage that is fermented with lactic acid bacteria, which is a strain of bacteria that is beneficial to your intestinal tract.

https://www.foodpreservationmethods.com/sauerkraut-kimchi-pickles-relishes/sauerkraut/making

 

2. Fermented lemon


Preserved or pickled lemons provide a delicious way to incorporate fermented foods into your diet. It has a milder taste and it increases flavors when used in cooking. We are sharing a recipe for making pickled lemons, and an article with five different ways to use those lemons in your cooking.

http://www.culturesforhealth.com/lacto-fermented-lemons-recipe

http://www.thekitchn.com/5-ways-to-use-up-a-jar-of-preserved-lemons-ingredient-spotlight-187451

 

3. Kimchi


This recipe for Kimchi uses Napa cabbage to make the traditional Korean pickled cabbage condiment. This recipe is easy to follow and you will never fail!

http://drbenkim.com/how-make-kim-chi.htm

 

4. Shio Koji


Shio koji is a traditional natural seasoning product made from fermented rice, which is used in traditional Japanese cooking to tenderize and enhance the rich flavors of your food. Shio Koji gaining popularity in modern Japanese cuisine and at home.


What is shio koji?

http://www.justonecookbook.com/how-to/how-to-make-shio-koji/

http://youtu.be/tH0Edx9nU40

Here are some additional recipes for making shio koji:

http://www.kojiya.jp/shiokoji/index.html

http://www.kojiya.jp/shiokoji/making.html

 

5. Pickled Garlic and Black Garlic


Garlic is a super food. It stabilizes blood sugar. It is antimicrobial. When fermented, it is even better.


Pickled Garlic


Pickled garlic is easy to make. The pickling process serves to mellow the flavor of the garlic while at the same time imparting all of the benefits of fermentation to a product that we use a lot in cooking.

http://www.deliciousobsessions.com/2012/09/52-weeks-of-bad-a-bacteria-week-32-lactofermented-garlic-updated-for-the-pickl-it/

Here’s a video that shows you how to make pickled garlic, and it contains a pretty cool trick for peeling a pound of garlic in one minute!

http://www.growingagreenerworld.com/pickled-garlic-recipe-video/



Black garlic


Black Garlic is fermented using a different method. This is not as easy to make as pickled garlic, as it gets smelly and needs ventilation while fermenting, but the instruction is quite simple.

http://www.shinshine.com/my-blog/2014/03/rc-black-garlic.html

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Hopefully, these recipes will be useful to you as you find ways to incorporate fermented foods into your diet. We will post more exciting recipes for fermented foods in the future.

For more information about the Love and Compassion approach to dietary and nutritional therapy, and to learn how everything you eat directly effects your overall health and longevity, you are welcome to visit: http://loveandcompassion.com.

Thank you.

Mika Ichihara

 

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